Post 22 The unsung heroes of the health service



When patients are grateful for the care they receive, be it in hospital, in the GP's surgery or at home, they often express their gratitude and leave small gifts for the doctors and nurses.      The doctors are 'marvellous' the nurses 'angels'.  So they may be and such recognition can be great motivating factors.   But what of all the other  equally vital members of the team; the paramedics, porters, cooks, cleaners, managers, records and maintenance staff  without whom the frontline staff couldn't operate?    Their contribution is just as essential but all too often is overlooked.  I hope this story helps to redress the balance.

 I make no apology for presenting it exactly as it came to me.  I believe that to do otherwise would result in a loss of its warmth and spontaneity.
                                                                        ----------------------------------------------------------

Today an angel knocked on my hospital door.. his name was john 💎

They say everything happens for a reason and this has jus blew my head off a little bit.


Laying in my bed in hospital and there a knock on the door, it was this little old man an he had a volunteer badge on askin me if I wanted a chat.   I was starting to feel abit better finally so said yeah come in coz felt bad to send him away as he was clearly disabled. I'm not the most sociable of people wen am sick but something just told me I should speak to him.    He introduced himself as john an even his speech seemed effected by whatever it was.   
He sat down an we got talking and he was so funny an uplifting an he was just waffling away then I noticed his hand was clenched tightly and knew straight way he must have same condition as my lil Max,     so I asked him an I'm glad I did coz his reply was the most reassuring thing I've herd.

He said I'm spastic, well that's what I was told as a kid.     I stopped him and said it's called cerebral palsy now,    he told me he was left side effected but he was clearly the worst end of the scale max being the milder end.      I told him about max and he went on to tell me about his life, the fact he'd worked 40 years for an insurance company and plays golf and tries out every pub in England. He told me he's been living on his own for 12 years since his mum died an it literally brought a tear to my eye.
John is the more serve end of hemiplegia and maxs is much milder in comparison and he's sat there happy as anything telling me how wonderful his life has been.

So grateful to have had that knock at the door ️ was defiantly something I needed to hear from someone who's lived with the same condition my son faces for 62 years

He probably didn't no but it was the most heartwarming thing to hear..    it was like I was sent a living angel of comfort for my worries for my babies future... thank you John

 Images used are library photos and do not illustrate the characters in the story.



Thoughts for the day

1)     Charity suffereth long, and is kind;
             Charity envieth not itself, is not puffed up.       Corithians; ch13 v1

2)      Imperfect people can make the world a better place.    Ken Follett 1949 …



Do you have a medical story to share with readers of this blog – the sort of tale you might relate to a friend over a cup of coffee or with a mate in the pub?
If so, do get in touch using the ‘contact me’ tab on the Home Page.



























Comments